Turning memories into memoirs

BY ALYSSON AREDAS

Brain expert Dr. Linda Sasser firmly believes that everyone has a life story worth telling. Some just need help realizing it.

During her program “From Memories to Memoir” held at Covenant Village of Turlock in August, Sasser taught individuals how to reflect on their life by triggering memories and stimulating the mind towards writing their own memoir.

“From Memories to Memoir” stemmed from a session from Sasser’s “Maintaining Cognitive Vitality” retreat, wherein which she discussed causes of forgetting, how aging impacts the brain and memory, and ways to distinguish normal-age related changes from possible indicators of dementia or Alzheimer’s disease.

The session, entitled “Mentoring, Memoir Writing, and Memory Review,” prompted an audience member to ask Sasser to expand her memoir writing component into a longer program. In response, Sasser created “From Memories to Memoir.”

During “From Memories to Memoir,” attendees learned what a memoir is, the various formats of memoir writing, and the benefits of creating a memoir. Sasser said that these memoirs are not necessarily intended for publication, rather they are meant to leave a legacy for family or to help an individual think back on his or her life.

“Life goes by so fast these days,” said Sasser. “We live it, but we often don’t take enough time to reflect.”

Sasser holds a Ph.D. in educational psychology and has more than 30 years of experience as a university professor, workshop facilitator and professional speaker. She started her business, Brain and Memory Health, to address growing concerns regarding Alzheimer’s disease and dementia.

“I studied research on brain health and what we need to do to keep our brain functioning optimally as we get older,” said Sasser. “I consider myself an educator and it’s my passion to educate people about things they can be doing to keep their brain healthy and how they can improve their memory.”

She has also created a Brain Enrichment Course, which aims to help adults with normal age-related memory changes or minor cognitive impairment maintain cognitive function.

For more information, visit brainandmemoryhealth.com.

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